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    What are the types of Blood Tests?

    Blood Tests By Editorial Team , National Institute of Health / Jan 12, 2013
    What are the types of Blood Tests?

    There are 4 types of blood tests such as CBC, blood chemistry tests, blood enzyme tests, etc.

    Some of the most common blood tests are:

    1. A complete blood count (CBC)
    2. Blood chemistry tests
    3. Blood enzyme tests
    4. Blood tests to assess heart disease risk

     

     

    Complete Blood Count

    The CBC is one of the most common blood tests. It's often done as part of a routine checkup.

    The CBC can help detect blood diseases and disorders, such as anemia, infections, clotting problems, blood cancers, and immune system disorders. This test measures many different parts of your blood, as discussed in the following paragraphs.

    Red Blood Cells

    Red blood cells carry oxygen from your lungs to the rest of your body. Abnormal red blood cell levels may be a sign of anemia, dehydration (too little fluid in the body), bleeding, or another disorder.

    White Blood Cells

    White blood cells are part of your immune system, which fights infections and diseases. Abnormal white blood cell levels may be a sign of infection, blood cancer, or an immune system disorder.

    A CBC measures the overall number of white blood cells in your blood. A CBC with differential looks at the amounts of different types of white blood cells in your blood.

    Platelets

    Platelets (PLATE-lets) are blood cell fragments that help your blood clot. They stick together to seal cuts or breaks on blood vessel walls and stop bleeding.

    Abnormal platelet levels may be a sign of a bleeding disorder (not enough clotting) or a thrombotic disorder (too much clotting).

    Hemoglobin

    Hemoglobin (HEE-muh-glow-bin) is an iron-rich protein in red blood cells that carries oxygen. Abnormal hemoglobin levels may be a sign of anemia, sickle cell anemia, thalassemia (thal-a-SE-me-ah), or other blood disorders.

    If you have diabetes, excess glucose in your blood can attach to hemoglobin and raise the level of hemoglobin A1c.

    Hematocrit

    Hematocrit (hee-MAT-oh-crit) is a measure of how much space red blood cells take up in your blood. A high hematocrit level might mean you're dehydrated. A low hematocrit level might mean you have anemia. Abnormal hematocrit levels also may be a sign of a blood or bone marrow disorder.

    Mean Corpuscular Volume

    Mean corpuscular (kor-PUS-kyu-lar) volume (MCV) is a measure of the average size of your red blood cells. Abnormal MCV levels may be a sign of anemia or thalassemia.

    Blood Chemistry Tests/Basic Metabolic Panel



    The basic metabolic panel (BMP) is a group of tests that measures different chemicals in the blood. These tests usually are done on the fluid (plasma) part of blood. The tests can give doctors information about your muscles (including the heart), bones, and organs, such as the kidneys and liver.

    The BMP includes blood glucose, calcium, and electrolyte tests, as well as blood tests that measure kidney function. Some of these tests require you to fast (not eat any food) before the test, and others don't. Your doctor will tell you how to prepare for the test(s) you're having.

    Blood Glucose

    Glucose is a type of sugar that the body uses for energy. Abnor...

     

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