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Stones Can Be Formed In These 6 Parts Of Your Body

Other Diseases By Tavishi Dogra , Onlymyhealth editorial team / Aug 21, 2019
Stones Can Be Formed In These 6 Parts Of Your Body

There is a problem of stones in different parts of the kidneys and the body. Th problem of appendicitis becomes so large in some cases that the patient may need to undergo surgery. 

 

You must have heard of stones (problem) in different parts of the kidneys and the body. The problem of stone becomes so large in some cases that the patient may need to undergo surgery. Generally, people believe that the stone is in our kidneys, whereas, it is not. Stones can occur in different parts of our body. If you are surprised to hear this, don't be, as, it is true. Stones are made in several parts of our body. We are going to tell you about such parts of our body that can form stones.

Kidney

These hard elements increase when minerals, usually calcium, begin to build up in your urinary tract. They cause unbearable pain when they become sufficiently sized to obstruct your urine. These cause pain in your back, especially near your hips and ribs. You can also see a piece of blood or stone in your urine. Small stones sometimes come out of the urine on their own. But you may need surgery to get rid of large stones.

Throat

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Your tonsils are two lumps of tissue on the back of your throat, which help to flush out germs. Food, dead skin or other types of waste get collected at that place and take the form of stones, known as tonsilloliths. This may cause:

  • sore throat
  • bad breath
  • swelling with white spots 

You can usually remove this type of stone with your toothbrush or cotton. If still, it's persistent and does not leave, talk to your doctor.

Urinary Bladder

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The reason for stones in the bladder is not doing/having urine properly, or there could be another reason behind it, i.e. minerals (could be too much in your urine while others are very less). This type of stone is formed on its own and gets bigger by going into your bladder. While urinating, you may get foam or blood in your urine. You may also have lower abdominal pain. Your doctor can remove it through surgery or medications.

Gallbladder

This small organ on your right side above the stomach stores digestive bile juice. A compound called bilirubin present in cholesterol and bile can give rise to gallstones. They are usually too small to cause pain or require treatment.

Mouth

Nobody knows about this, but there may be stones inside your mouth. They can cause pain and swelling. When you eat food, it can block the saliva produced from it. You can see white stones under your tongue. It is usually not very serious. If you drink more water, it will drain out, and if it does not come out then contact your doctor.

Nose

This type of rare stone starts to form when a small piece of button, eraser, seed, wood, or something similar gets stuck in your nose. This often happens in childhood. Over the years, it attracts minerals like calcium, magnesium, and iron and it grows in size. Eventually, you will start to have pain and a part of your nose may also close. Your doctor may treat it with a special device or you may need surgery.

Read more articles on Other Diseases

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