Red Eyes? Here Are The 5 Reasons Behind It

Updated at: Mar 09, 2020
Red Eyes? Here Are The 5 Reasons Behind It

Red eyes are a response to some kind of irritation causing the blood vessels in the conjunctiva to dilate. Here is what causes it…

Arushi Bidhuri
Other DiseasesWritten by: Arushi BidhuriPublished at: Mar 09, 2020

Do your eyes look red these days? Red-eye is a condition in which the white surface of the eyes becomes red. If your eyes are bloodshot, it’s an indication that something is up with your health. Red eyes are a response to some kind of irritation causing the blood vessels in the conjunctiva to dilate. There are definitely ways to fix this problem, but first, let’s get to the root of the problem in order to treat it.

Causes of Red Eyes

Dry Eyes

When a person doesn’t produce enough tears to nourish or lubricate the eyes, they are said to be suffering from dry eye syndrome. The lack of moisture can irritate your eyes, causing the blood vessels in the conjunctiva to dilate. Burning, itching, stinging and sensitivity to light are some of the common symptoms of dry eyes. Your doctor will recommend some special eye drops to reduce inflammation and get rid of dry eyes.

eye

Pink Eye

Pink eye or conjunctivitis is caused due to viruses, bacteria and allergies or something that irritates the eyes. Regardless of the cause, red-eye occurs when something irritates the conjunctiva. Symptoms of red eyes include thick yellow discharge that crusts over the eyelashes, white discharge from the eyes, itchy eyes, burning, blurred vision, more tears than usual or swollen conjunctiva. All of these symptoms are similar to other eye conditions, so the best way for a proper diagnosis is by visiting the doctor. A pink eye typically goes away in a few weeks, but some antibiotics can help speed up the recovery.

Also Read: Signs That You’re a Victim Of Social Fatigue

Eyelid Inflammation

eyelid

Eyelid inflammation or blepharitis can make your eyes red, itchy and irritated. Bacterial infection, makeup getting in the eyes, or plugged up glands in your eyelids are some of the common causes of blepharitis. Holding a warm compress against the eyes can sometimes relieve inflammation or unplug the glands. If this doesn’t work, visit an ophthalmologist to get the best treatment.

Also Read: All About Japanese Water Therapy

Exhausted Eyes

When we concentrate on something too intensely, we forget to blink our eyes and tire them out. This causes eyestrain, which in turn irritation, making the blood vessels in your conjunctiva to dilate and thus the bloodshot look. The simplest way to combat the condition is by reminding yourself to blink more often when you’re concentrating on something too intensely. Follow the 20-20-20 rule: every 20 minutes, look at something 20 feet away for at least 20 seconds.

Damaged Cornea

cornea

If dirt, dust or sand gets into the eyes, you can end up suffering from a corneal abrasion. A corneal abrasion is a scratch on the clear front surface of the cornea. When there is an unwanted intrusion in the eyes, it can result in tearing, redness, sensitivity to light, pain and even a headache. You can easily get rid of corneal abrasion by cleaning your eyes with water or saline solution. If it is really irritating you, then consult a doctor who will recommend an antibiotic eye drop to alleviate the problem.

Read more articles on Other Diseases

Disclaimer

All possible measures have been taken to ensure accuracy, reliability, timeliness and authenticity of the information; however Onlymyhealth.com does not take any liability for the same. Using any information provided by the website is solely at the viewers’ discretion. In case of any medical exigencies/ persistent health issues, we advise you to seek a qualified medical practitioner before putting to use any advice/tips given by our team or any third party in form of answers/comments on the above mentioned website.

This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK