Sleep Deprivation May Trigger Asthma Attacks In Adults

Updated at: May 13, 2020
Sleep Deprivation May Trigger Asthma Attacks In Adults

Poor sleep is a potential trigger of asthma attacks in adults. Not just that, they are also highly likely to suffer from other health problems.

Chanchal Sengar
LatestWritten by: Chanchal SengarPublished at: May 13, 2020

Many people may not consider sleep as an important factor for health but the sleep cycle has a very crucial role to play in health and wellness. Rest is equally important as being physically active throughout the day. A human body needs time to reinvigorate itself during the night. Therefore, health experts advise a minimum of 6-7 hours of undisturbed sleep for adults. Work and rest are two sides of the coin of health. Inadequate sleep or disturbed sleep or sleep deprivation has negative health impacts which can trigger lifelong issues such as asthma, insomnia, digestive problems, and neurological issues. Watch out for your sleep timing and improve if you do not want to put yourself to these health risks. To know how sleep and asthma are related, read ahead.

Can poor sleep cause asthma?

There are various triggers of asthma including long exposure to air pollution, dirt and dust particles. Anything that can potentially impact the functioning of your lungs and respiratory system is a potential trigger for asthma and other similar problems. As per researchers, sleep deprivation or not getting sufficient sleep can also trigger asthma. Poor sleep quality can trigger asthma symptoms in adolescents as well as adults. Since both of these categories are the ones most ignorant towards sleep. Millennials are always on their phones and gadgets, with zero interest in rest. This is why they are the maximum risk of sleep-related problems. The University of Pittsburg in the United States of America conducted a research to establish the link between sleep and asthma. Senior author Faith Luyster said, "Our study shows that adults with asthma are equally affected by too little (or sometimes too much) sleep.”

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The Research Findings

The team analyzed the medical and lifestyle history of people who suffered from Asthma attacks. They found that short sleepers are at a greater risk as compared to normal sleepers and long sleepers. While the risk is about 59 percent in short sleepers, it is 45 and 51 percent in normal and long sleepers, respectively. Not just asthma but short sleepers were also found to have many health problems.

The study published in the journal ‘Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology’ surveyed over 1,300 adults with asthma complaints. They were then categorized as per the sleep hours on workdays and weekends. Adults were the most among short sleepers with increased chances of an asthma attack, dry cough and other respiratory issues.

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Short sleepers also found to have a poor lifestyle with complaints of physical and mental health-related problems. Gailen D Marshall, Editor-in-Chief of the Journal said, "This study adds solid evidence to the practice of asthma patients discussing sleep issues with their allergist to help determine if they need to change their asthma plan to achieve adequate sleep as a component of overall good asthma management."

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