• shareIcon

    Diabetic Pregnant Women and Fasting

    Pregnancy By Mansi Kohli , Onlymyhealth editorial team / Sep 28, 2011
    Diabetic Pregnant Women and Fasting

    Eat food in specific interval of time that maintains blood glucose levels in fasting during pregnancy. Read more on foods that can be eaten during navratri.

    Young pregnant woman eating saladEat some food every few hours so that it is satisfying and yet does not push the blood glucose levels up too fast.

     

    Food that can be eaten during navratri

    • Lauki raita
    • Bottle gourd (lauki)
    • One must eat almonds (badam) in between as snacks.
    • Stuffed kuttu (buckwheat) roti with pumkin (kaddu) vegetable.
    • Eat fruits at regular interval like papaya, pear and berries.

     

    Diabetic patients need to take care. A pregnant woman needs to take care too. A diabetic and pregnant woman thus, given the facts, needs to doubly take care.

     

    Pregnant women who have been diabetic before getting pregnant have important health concerns to take care of. Supplementing the care needed for pregnancy is a screening and controlling of their blood sugar levels, as well as management of their medicines. Some crucial steps to take to ensure that both the woman and the baby stay healthy are:


    Preparation

     

    Meeting with your physician before becoming pregnant is very important. With a blood test, your physician evaluate how well your diabetes has been controlled over the past 8-12 weeks, and if it is thus safe to go off the birth control pills.

     

    Having other medical tests

     

    Llike urinalysis, cholesterol tests as well as an eye exam for glaucoma, cataracts, and retinopathy – can help your doctor prevent the development of diabetic complications during pregnancy.

    A pre-conception counseling appointment with your physician is another important step. It assists in educating women to be physically and emotionally prepared as well as healthy for pregnancy.

     

    Blood sugar control before and during pregnancy

     

    A proper control of blood sugar pertains to keeping blood glucose levels within the ideal range - besides balancing meals, exercise, and diabetes medications.

     

    Good blood sugar control is important before becoming pregnant because many women do not even know they are pregnant until the baby has been growing for 2-4 weeks. High blood sugar levels early in the pregnancy (before 13 weeks) can cause birth defects, and during pregnancy, it can increase the risk of miscarriage and can increase your risk of developing diabetes-related complications.

     

    Effect of diabetes on the baby

     

    Babies of diabetic women are apt to be considerably larger than others (also called ‘macrosomia’). These babies receive too much sugar because their mothers have high blood sugar levels. When the extra sugar is converted to fat, it goes to make a fat baby. Sometimes the baby becomes too large to be delivered vaginally, and a cesarean delivery becomes necessary.

     

    If you have high blood sugar levels consistently during pregnancy (especially in the 24 hours before delivery), your baby may develop dangerously low blood sugars right after delivery. Your baby may also have mineral imbalances such as calcium or magnesium, which can be replaced with medication.

     

    Diabetes medication during pregnancy - The physician can tell you how to adjust your medication/insulin intake during pregnancy. Generally your body will require more insulin during pregnancy, especially during the third trimester.

     

    If you take oral medications to control your diabetes, your physician may switch your medication to insulin during pregnancy, since the safety of using certain oral medications may not be known and/or better sugar control may be achieved with insulin.

     

    Diet plan

     

    Your doctor and you should work together to adjust your meal plans in such a way as to keep your blood sugar level in check as well as to provide more calories for your growing baby.

     

    Pregnancy span

     

    Women with mild diabetes or who are very well controlled often carry their baby to term without any problems. However, many physicians prefer to plan for an early delivery of the babies of diabetic women, usually around 38-39 weeks.

     

    Keeping blood sugar in check during labor and delivery

     

    Control of blood sugar levels remains important even during labor, which can be a stressful time for both the mother and the baby. In case you have been taking insulin during your pregnancy, you may be given insulin by injection or intravenously with the beginning of labor. Right after delivery, the need for insulin cuts down instantly.

     

    Besides keeping these facts in mind, one also needs to quit smoking

     

    Smoking can harm your baby and increases the chances that you will have problems from diabetes. Taking folic acid supplements before getting pregnant may help prevent neural tube defects in the baby.

     

    Thus, though being pregnant is not much smooth sailing, for diabetic women it is doubly so. However that will also not be impossible either. With the right assistance from one’s doctor, a healthy diet and exercise, as well as loving support from the husband and the family – a diabetic woman can too enjoy the joys of motherhood!

     

    Read more articles on Pregnancy.

    Disclaimer

    All possible measures have been taken to ensure accuracy, reliability, timeliness and authenticity of the information; however Onlymyhealth.com does not take any liability for the same. Using any information provided by the website is solely at the viewers’ discretion. In case of any medical exigencies/ persistent health issues, we advise you to seek a qualified medical practitioner before putting to use any advice/tips given by our team or any third party in form of answers/comments on the above mentioned website.

    This website uses cookie or similar technologies, to enhance your browsing experience and provide personalised recommendations. By continuing to use our website, you agree to our Privacy Policy and Cookie Policy. OK