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What Clothes can Tell about your Health

People wear different style and type of clothes which can say a lot about their personality and health. Here is all that you can tell about a person's clothes by just looking at them.

Fashion & Beauty By Meenakshi Chaudhary / Aug 12, 2014

Clothes and Health

Your clothes can tell a lot about you, more than just your personality. What you wear has a connection with your health. The fabric you wear, the size and the type of clothes you wear can have a say in your health. Here is what your clothes can tell about your health. Image Courtesy: Getty

The Slim Fit

As you must have noticed, many shelves in most of stores are dominated by clothes that carry the 'slim fit' tag. A rising popularity of such clothes can be symbolic of the need to be toned and to show it off. Image Courtesy: Getty

The XL Fit

While the slim fit is getting popular, there are so many obese people who don't like showing the chubby parts of their body. Obesity is a common health problem making the XL size more common than ever. If you are wearing clothes that are way too loose it’s more likely that you are hiding the extra pounds. Image Courtesy: Getty

 

The Tight Fit

If you wear tight fitting clothes then you are at a higher risk of skin problems as well as other health issues. Tight fitting clothes may even cause impotency in men and result in poor circulation. Wearing too tight clothes for too long can be harmful for your health. Image Courtesy: Getty

The Slim

If you wear a number less than the right fit, you are probably fighting with your buttons to get your waist into slimmer clothing. If you wear jeans that are tight around your waist you are at a higher risk of back problems and muscle injuries. Image Courtesy: Getty

Loose Cotton

People who wear loose, comfortable clothes made from fabrics such as cotton are more likely to escape unwanted skin problems such as itching, rashes, allergies and infections. Wearing loose clothes also helps you to feel comfortable and stay mentally relaxed. Image Courtesy: Getty

Leather

Wearing clothes made of leather or other synthetic fabrics may not be that good for your skin and bones. If you wear such clothes way too often, you are more at risk of having skin problems and aching bones as such clothing may put continuous stress on your bones and joints. Image Courtesy: Getty

Sleeveless

If you like most of your shirts without sleeves, you may want to reconsider your choice. Sleeves help protect your skin from the harmful rays of the sun. Avoiding sleeves can pose higher risk of skin problems including cancer. Image Courtesy: Getty

Used Clothes

If your friends see you repeat clothes on the next day, they will understand something about your hygiene. However, you should also understand that it may be harmful for your health to repeat used clothes as sweat offers perfect place for germs to breed and then infect you more easily. Image Courtesy: Getty

Misjudge

People often judge their health with the clothes they wear. You can wear anything and look fit and healthy however that may not be true. A recent research in Huffington Post found that people who judge their fitness with clothes are more likely to let bad lifestyle habits to carry on resulting in higher risks of problems like diabetes and high blood pressure. Image Courtesy: Getty

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