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Cesarean risk not upped by Labour Induction

Snr By Agency News , Agency News / Jul 17, 2013
Cesarean risk not upped by Labour Induction

New study reveals that the induction of labour may not be the prime reason for the rise in Cesarean sections, it could be other factors.

doctors conducting c-section Induction of labour may not be the prime reason for the rise in cesarean sections. This has been brought to light under a new study.

It was earlier believed that inducing labour in a woman whose pregnancy has lasted for too long and whose water hasn’t broken would need a c-section. But a review of 37 studies on labour induction has revealed that it can actually decrease the risk of having a c-section.

Dr. Stephen Wood who is the lead author of the report from the University of Calgary in Canada has said, "It's quite remarkable that the studies do show a slight reduction of C-sections." This is because previous studies have linked inducing labour with increased risk of women having c-sections, which of course then led to the belief that reducing inductions would reduce the number of cesarean procedures.

That research, however, is mostly based on studies that didn't account for other complications that might increase the women's risk for C-sections.

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